Saturday, April 04, 2015

Rediscoveries of Lost Gems- Larry Coryell



















Larry Coryell- Coryell

When I was searching my brain for a record that deserved to be rediscovered, I came up with Larry Coryell's self-titled album from 1969 entitled simply Coryell. While Coryell's official recording debut was on Chico Hamilton's The Dealer, this is the record that would cement his reputation as one of the most sought after lead guitarists during the Jazz-fusion era in the 70's. 

From the beginning of the manic guitar solo on "Sex", you can tell that Coryell is not playing around, eventually filtering his guitar through a copious amount of wah-wah and phaser effects. "Beautiful Woman" starts out unassumingly enough, with a pleasing vocal and mellow tone, but the bottom drops out in the last minute with screaming vocals and an especially biting guitar solo. Then, the urgent rhythm of  "The Jam With Albert" comes rushing out the gates, and the rest of the band masterfully compliment Coryell's magnificent solos with an especially knotty back-beat. At over nine minutes long, this song is clearly the centerpiece of the album that places Coryell's talents on full display.  The title of the next track "Elementary Guitar Solo #5" couldn't be more ironic, as Coryell's guitar effortlessly climbs up and down the frets like a madman on a mission. At just under forty minutes, this record is long enough to engage your mind and soul, but still short enough to digest in one sitting.

I hope you enjoy listening to this record, and I would love to hear what you think of it!

Link is in comments.

4 comments:

Kevin said...

Enjoy!

http://www.mirrorcreator.com/files/1SJRGAWV/Larry_Coryell_-_1969_-_Coryell.7z_links

LYSERGICFUNK said...

Many thanks

boogieman said...

Good choice indeed but my favorite Corryel album is probably Barefoot Boy on Flying Dutchman. Pretty short but superb from beginning to finish.
Thanks for sharing.

Kevin said...

Lysergic Funk: I really dig your blog, and have discovered some great stuff on there over the years.

Boogieman: I totally agree with you about Barefoot Boy. You really can't go wrong with any of the late 60's to mid 70's Coryell. I also dig Fairyland and Spaces quite a bit. What are some of your other favorite guitarists from this era?

Thanks to both of you for stopping by, and spreading the love.

Best, Kevin